Winner of the The Prix de la Photographie, Paris (P×3) 2020  Honorable Mention 

One of the best ways to start your morning is with an email that starts like this: “Dear Joao Carlos,

It is my great pleasure to inform you that your work has been awarded a winning placement in The Prix de la Photographie, Paris (P×3) 2020 – Congratulations!” 

During the past decade, Px3 has become one of the most prestigious photography awards in Europe thanks to the outstanding quality of entries and our distinguished jury of experts. 

This award even feel better because the images I created wer created post covid times , but the concept and idea behind the series happened during covide . 

I have to give a big thanks to my awesome models  and freinds Rodrigo Castelhano  and Fabricia Pereira  

The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak means life has changed for us all. It may cause you to feel anxious, stressed, worried, sad, bored, lonely or frustrated.

It’s important to remember it is OK to feel this way and that everyone reacts differently – for most of us, these difficult feelings will pass.

 

The world  has changed—at least for the foreseeable future. We transitioned off the streets, left the shops, and came home from work—all to lead our private home lives, 24/7.  

When we do go out, we no longer shake hands or give hugs. It’s not safe to fly. Markets, restaurants, bars, department stores, malls, beauty salons—all the places where we used to congregate and interact with one another—have closed,Even if they are beginning  to reopen in some places . The goal of “social distancing,” “sheltering in place,” and “self-quarantining” is to slow the spread of the virus, and the need to do so is clear.

But what is also clear is the profound effect this will have on the approximately 37% of American citizens who self-identify as chronically lonely.

Loneliness is a feeling of distress people experience when their social relations are not the way they would like. It is a personal feeling of social isolation. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, one in four Australians were lonely

This massive and sudden severing of personal interactions is difficult for any of us, because as social animals, humans are wired to connect. 

But it is especially threatening to those of us who are, or who feel, alone—human beings are meant to be social, even though some are fine with solitude. “And the way that they combat feelings of stress or anxiety or loneliness is to get out there and do things,”

For the chronically lonely, the introduction of sudden and mandated separation and isolation is the psychological equivalent of introducing random explosions into the lives of veterans with PTSD.

I end today’s post with a challenge for you and me alike: Which persons in our lives seem candidates for us to make a special effort to reach out to? 

These isolation days are the perfect days to call, text, email, or FaceTime not only anyone we might know who we think might often feel lonely and disconnected, but also any of our other connections that merit refreshing. Why not give a call to that unmarried aunt or uncle, or to those cousins with whom you haven’t spoken for far too long, or to that college friend you haven’t seen since that reunion years ago?


This massive and sudden severing of personal interactions is difficult for any of us, because as social animals, humans are wired to connect. But it is especially threatening to those of us who are, or who feel, alone—human beings are meant to be social, even though some are fine with solitude. “And the way that they combat feelings of stress or anxiety or loneliness is to get out there and do things,”

For the chronically lonely, the introduction of sudden and mandated separation and isolation is the psychological equivalent of introducing random explosions into the lives of veterans with PTSD.

I end today’s post with a challenge for you and me alike: Which persons in our lives seem candidates for us to make a special effort to reach out to? 

These isolation days are the perfect days to call, text, email, or FaceTime not only anyone we might know who we think might often feel lonely and disconnected, but also any of our other connections that merit refreshing.

 Why not give a call to that unmarried aunt or uncle, or to those cousins with whom you haven’t spoken for far too long, or to that college friend you haven’t seen since that reunion years ago?

Men and Woman alike suffer from anxiety and loneliness! this series is called “the stages of self isolation “

Here is a little context to help with understanding the images a little better !! The stages of self Isolation

Week one: Adjustment and anxiety

We’ve experienced this already. A period of adjustment to the “new normal”. Fear is still apparent, and uncertainty is abundant. People have to deal with loneliness, a totally altered world, and may also experience “illness behaviour” from anxiety about perceived symptoms.

Week two: Boredom and frustration

A move away from anxiety and fear into boredom, hopelessness, aimlessness, or loss. People might feel “sick” of their situation, or feel that life will never go back to normal.

Weeks three and four: Anger

Anger and paranoia start to set in. As the curve flattens the reality of what could have happened in a worst-case scenario becomes more distant and questionable, so people start to become frustrated with those who are keeping them inside, or believe that the pandemic is a hoax.

This phase is typified by the marches currently happening in the US, where people start demanding their rights, and ignoring the potential dangers of the pandemic.

Week five-onwards: Acceptance

People will start to accept their “new” world and find it easier to manage their fluctuating emotions.